AC Matilda International Diabetes Projects

AC Matilda Diabetes Project is a non-profit, global health project that is dedicated to improve the health of people in their respective community.
AC Matilda Diabetes Project is a diverse, tolerant and inclusive Irish society where each person is empowered to fulfil the following:

1. Health potentials regardless of their background and to live a diabetic free life.

2. To live up to the goals and dreams as equals in the society.

3. To be a contributing member of the community.

1. Health potentials regardless of their background and to live a diabetic free life,

2. To live up the goals and dreams as equals in the society

3. To be a contributing member of the community.

MISSION STATEMENT:
To inspire, empower, prevent and improve the lives of people leaving with Diabetes.

O

  • The main objective is to create awareness, education AND increase access to information on prevention and care of diabetes and its complications.
  • Raise awareness of diabetes by being a powerful voice to improve education, access to quality care, quality of life, prevention of complications and type 2 diabetes, and to help end discrimination and stigma related to diabetes.
  • Discuss with patients the importance of lifestyle in the management of diabetes and the prevention of complications, especially the role of exercise and nutrition.
  • Opening a Diabetes Camp for young people & parents.
    Diabetes camps offer a place where children with diabetes learn important skills to take charge of their health, become part of a community, and make friends with other children who aren’t afraid of needles and who understand exactly what it means to “feel low,” or “feel high”. The Camp also offers parents opportunities to relax, knowing that their children are well cared for by people who are expertly trained in diabetes management.

What is Diabetes

Diabetes is an illness caused by inadequate or lack of production of insulin (a hormone) by the pancreas (a gland in the abdomen). Insulin is responsible for absorbing glucose (a simple sugar) into the bloodstream, where it is available for body cells to use for growth and energy.
Normally, when people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the correct amount of insulin to absorb the glucose. In people with diabetes, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the body’s cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Hence, Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine and passes out of the body, with the result that the body loses its main source of fuel.
If untreated, diabetes can cause blindness, heart disease, strokes, kidney failure, nerve damage and birth defects in babies born to women with diabetes. There are two major forms of diabetes — type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Both types of diabetes tend to run in families, although only 10% of type 1 patients will have a family history of diabetes; in type 2 diabetes, this figure rises to 30%.
Diabetes is a disease that affects the whole family, especially when a child is
diagnosed.


Symptoms of Diabetes
Symptoms of diabetes can be similar in type 1 diabetes, typically diagnosed in children and teens, and type 2 diabetes, which most often occurs in adults. Symptoms of any type of diabetes are related to high blood and urine glucose levels and include,

• frequent infections,
• nausea,
• vomiting, and
• blurred vision.
• hunger,
• dehydration,
• weight loss or gain,
• fatigue,
• dry mouth,
• slow-healing wounds, cuts, or sores,
• itching skin, and
• increased susceptibility to infections

Type 1 Diabetes

This type of diabetes is known as insulin-dependent diabetes, this type is most often seen in children or young adults, although the disorder can appear at any age.

Type 2 Diabetes
This is the most common type of diabetes — 90%—95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

RAISE AWARENESS of diabetes by being a powerful voice to improve education, access to quality care, quality of life, prevention of complications on type 2 diabetes, and to help end discrimination and stigma related to diabetes.
Discuss with patients the importance of lifestyle in the management of diabetes and the prevention of complications, especially the role of exercise AND nutrition

Awareness Campaigns

Gestational Diabetes
The diabetes generally disappears after the birth, although women who have had gestational diabetes are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Gestational diabetes is also known as pregnancy diabetes. This usually progresses during pregnancy.

Diabetes can occur temporarily during pregnancy, and reports suggest that it occurs in 2% to 10% of all pregnancies. Significant hormonal changes during pregnancy can lead to blood sugar elevation in genetically predisposed individuals. Blood sugar elevation during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes usually resolves once the baby is born.

However, 35% to 60% of women with gestational diabetes will eventually develop type 2 diabetes over the next 10 to 20 years, especially in those who require insulin during pregnancy and those who remain overweight after their delivery. Women with gestational diabetes are usually asked to undergo an oral glucose tolerance test about six weeks after giving birth to determine if their diabetes has persisted beyond the pregnancy, or if any evidence (such as impaired glucose tolerance) is present that may be a clue to a risk for developing diabetes.

Ruby has been involved in Pageants for 4 years and has held titles, Face of Wales and the International title of Face of Europe & The World. She is currently a finalist for Teen Galaxy UK as Teen Galaxy Cheshire. Ruby travels all over the UK and Ireland judging local and Charity pageants as well as National Pageants such as Face of England, Scotland, N Ireland: Natural Beauty England Wales & Scotland: Miss Belle England and Wales and Crown & Glory UK. She has also recently judged her first international pageant, Face of Europe & The World. As well as supporting pageants in her spare time, Ruby also models and was recently featured in the ad campaign of a major false lash brand. She is very well respected in the pageant community by people of all ages and regularly trains and gives advice to other contestants.